MnDOT Asks For Public Comment On New U.S. Bicycle Route

The meetings listed in this press release are at locations that are probably too far for most people in this area to attend. But there’s an online survey and the idea of another bike route in Minnesota is certainly exciting.

MnDOT asks for public comment on new U.S. bicycle route
Route will connect St. Paul to Grand Portage State Park

ST. PAUL — The public is invited to help the Minnesota Department of Transportation plan and name the new U.S Bicycle Route 41 between St. Paul and Grand Portage State Park.

Four public open houses will be held in June in Hinckley, White Bear Lake, Tofte and Duluth. At the workshops, people will have the opportunity to help identify which roads and trails should connect to create the new route. People can also suggest names for the new route.

An online survey and mapping tool are also available for people to comment at www.mndot.gov/bike/usbr41. Deadline to comment is June 23.

Open houses will be held:
– Tuesday, June 7, 4-6 p.m., at Hinckley Community Room, 106 First St. SE, Hinckley

– Thursday, June 9, 4-6 p.m., at the White Bear Lake Police and Fire Building, 4700 Miller Ave, White Bear Lake

– Tuesday, June 14, 3:30-5:30 p.m., at Duluth Central Library, Gold Room, 520 West Superior St., Duluth

– Thursday, June 16, 4-6 p.m., at Bluefin Bay On Lake Superior, Tofte Room, 7192 West Highway 61, Tofte

MnDOT will provide activities for children and light refreshments will be served.

Here's what's know about USBR 41 so far.
Here’s what’s know about USBR 41 so far.

The route will be approximately 325 miles long and will expand tourism opportunities by connecting with the state’s other designated U.S. Bicycle Route, the Mississippi River Trail — U.S. Bicycle Route 45. Minnesota’s segment of the 10-state MRT follows the Mississippi River from the headwaters at Itasca State Park near Bemidji to the Iowa border. The entire MRT extends 3,000 miles to the Gulf of Mexico.

U.S. Bicycle Route 41 was identified as a high priority corridor in the Statewide Bicycle System Plan.

Liz Walton, project manager, said the route will use existing local and regional trails and roadways.

“By connecting existing facilities we can have a route that’s ‘ride-ready’ in a short time. We’d like the public’s help in deciding which roads and trails are best for bicycling. We’ll develop something for everyone,” said Walton. “A U.S. bicycle route connects people, places and the things people love by bicycle. It creates an opportunity for a short local ride across town with friends or one across the country on an official bicycle route,” said Walton.

The U.S. Bicycle Route 41 project is intended to complement local bicycle planning. It will be a route of partnerships developed with adjacent network connections in mind and is intended to build upon communities’ efforts, help move local bicycle plans forward and to benefit communities and bicyclists alike.

Once public input is collected, MnDOT will develop a draft route and map, and schedule a second round of public meetings for final review and comments.